Shakespeare Hamlet Essay Questions

  • 1

    Hamlet is widely hailed as the first modern play in the English language. Which characteristics of its central character might account for this label?

    Hamlet is considered the first modern play partly because of the psychological depth of its main character -- Hamlet suffers from melancholy, self-doubt, and even delusions. The audience never quite knows what Hamlet is thinking, or what is real. In fact, Hamlet himself declares again and again that he doesn't understand his doubts either ("I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth.")

  • 2

    Death is a constant presence in this play. Does Hamlet's speech to Yorick's skull represent a philosophy of death? How does his attitude toward death differ from that of the gravediggers?

    Death was a much more ordinary presence in Elizabethan England than it is in the modern world. Infant mortality was high and plagues swept whole nations. In this sense, the gravediggers exhibit a much more realistic approach to death than most people. Hamlet uses the occasion for a more general examination of mortality. His attitude toward death is not necessarily inconsistent with that of the gravediggers, but it is different in his emphasis on metaphysical rather than physical implications of death.

  • 3

    Does the text hold up to a Freudian reading of Hamlet's relationship with his mother? How does Hamlet's relationship with Ophelia support, complicate or work against an Oedipal interpretation of the play?

    Certainly Hamlet does visit his mother's bedchamber, and is immensely interested in her sexual relationships with other men, both of which are classic elements of an Oedipal complex. Freud's reading of the play may have influenced his sexual theories—but it is important to remember the order of events, especially because scholars tend to label Hamlet "Freudian." Better stated, Freud is Shakespearean, not the other way around.

  • 4

    "To be or not to be" is the famous question that Hamlet poses in Act Three, Scene One. Explore this speech. What does he mean by this famous question? What events of the play prompt this speech?

    Hamlet is musing about death, but whose death, or what kind of death, is frustratingly difficult to pin down. He is perhaps contemplating suicide, perhaps thinking about the risks he must run in order to fulfill the task of revenge. He has an audience of Ophelia, Polonius and Claudius, who are eavesdropping on him; but he most likely does not realize that they are present.

  • 5

    The play within a play, the long soliloquies wherein Hamlet faces the audience and speaks to them directly, the vivid discussions of whether or not Hamlet is "acting" mad -- there are many elements of Hamlet that call attention to its status as a play, rather than reality. By showing the trappings of theater and non-reality, does Shakespeare make Hamlet's suffering seem more acute or more distant? How?

    "Life's but a stage," another Shakespearean character proclaims, and the playwright recognized quite well the dramatic trappings of life and the life-like elements of staged productions. Soliloquies are modern in that they break what is much later termed the "fourth wall" separating audience from stage; the character speaks directly to the audience. Although the whole atmosphere seems patently false and theatrical, this serves to draw Hamlet somehow closer. Somehow, the effect of such "metatheatrical" gestures is to show not how different acting is from life, but how similar life is to acting.

  • 6

    In terms of the usual categorizations, Shakespeare's tragedies end in death, his comedies in marriage. By this measure, Hamlet is a tragedy. But Shakespeare's best plays are a tragicomic mix. Choose and discuss two comical or farcical elements in Hamlet.

    The scene with gravediggers is a good example of tragedy mixed with comedy. The work is morbid, but the workers joke and sing as they go about their business. They seem totally unaware of the majestic tragedy unfolding itself in the castle nearby. On a smaller level, Yorick's skull embodies the tragicomic dichotomy; it is a gruesome, deathly object that once belonged to a joker. There are several other comic scenes, including much of Hamlet's dialogue with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, and most of Polonius' scenes before his death. This gruesome mixture of pathos and humor is the essence of Shakespearean theater.

  • 7

    Define revenge. Is Hamlet a traditional revenge play? What other forces are at work in Hamlet's psyche?

    Revenge is traditionally the cold-blooded pursuit to make up for one hurt with a strike against its perpetrator. Revenge is usually violent. Hamlet is hardly a traditional play of revenge, because the main character is so uncertain and ambivalent about both the original strike and what he should do about it. Melancholy and uncertainty play just as large a role in Hamlet's character as the desire for revenge.

  • 8

    Discuss the setting of Hamlet. What effect does setting the psycho-drama in a bleak northern castle -- similar to that in Macbeth -- have on the characters and audience?

    From the script, the audience gathers that Elsinore Castle is a remote place in northern Europe. Not much else is known: there were no sets in Shakespeare's time. But the setting certainly matches Hamlet's melancholy mood, and the isolation of the place helps make the violence and implied incest believable.

  • 9

    The play begins with the fantastical appearance of a ghost. Are we meant to believe that this is really Hamlet's father, or is he a figment of Hamlet's imagination? If he is imagined, is the rest of the play imagined as well?

    Hamlet struggles with the question of whether the ghost is his father and decides that he must be who he says he is. The audience remains in doubt, however, because of the ghost's claim that he comes from Purgatory (blasphemous in Elizabethan England), and the fact that Gertrude is unable to see it when it appears to Hamlet in her chamber. One of the moral questions of the play is resolved, however, when it becomes clear that Claudius is a murderer. Whether the ghost is Old Hamlet or a demon, he has told the truth about Claudius' guilt.

  • 10

    Can a healthy state be presided over by a corrupt ruler? Shakespeare draws frequent comparisons between the moral legitimacy of a leader and the health of a state. Is Denmark's monarchy responsible for the demise of the state in this play?

    At the end of the tragedy, it is not only Hamlet and most of the characters who die. The entire state of Denmark fails after Norway invades, and the health of the nation seems very much wrapped up with the moral state of the leader. This accords with the medieval idea of the "body politic" with the leader making up the head, literally, and the people the body of a personified state.

  • Selecting Powerful Argumentative Essay Topics On Hamlet: 15 Examples


    Hamlet being produced in the Renaissance period was made out of the tragic moments that incurred in the period in History. Shakespeare had been known to create a tragic kind of plays. He focuses on revenge, humanity, social issues and deaths. Hamlet is a story of betrayal, wrong accusation, revenge, and love.

    1. Hamlet’s Love To Ophelia
      • In the story of Hamlet, it is argumentative whether Hamlet until the end had loved Ophelia. Did he love him before and lost his love due to his mad desire for revenge? If he did not? Why is he greatly affected by her death? If yes, why does he push her to the extreme side of avoidance to him which is the nunnery?
    2. The creation of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern's Role.
      • In the story about intense plots for revenge, are the character made for comedy purposes? Or they have more unyielding roles? Can they be just omitted?
    3. Revenge in Hamlet.
      • Is the Hamlet, plainly pull it the thrust of events in the idea of revenge? Is it good to base revenge in ghost?
      • Does the death of many people morally justify the death?
      • How many revenge plots existed in the story?
      • Ghost in Hamlet
        • Does the presence of a ghost in the story pretty convincing? Are ghost real?
        • Hamlet's Relationship with the Ghost
        • Is the existence of revenge a cue in all of Hamlet’s action?
      • The Purpose of the “Murder of Gonzago.”
        • The people are exchanging a glance as the play goes, are the lines nothing inadmissible?
        • In the play. Did the King really show his guilt?
        • But why end in praying?
      • Conflict as essential to drama.
        • The struggle of his doubts further promoted the drama rather than Hamlet himself
        • Is the ambiguous thinking of Hamlet the main cause of all conflict?
      • Mistrusted Love: Ophelia and Polonius
        • Does Polonius have the rightful moral to paint the admission of Hamlet's love to Ophelia rudely?
        • Is the plain ignorance justifies Ophelia’s distrust to Hamlet?
        • Is her resort of going to nunnery despite the doubts, good or bad?
        • Is Polonius judgment a wrong perception?
        • Is this a blundering pursuit?
        • A mother To his Child
        • Is the instant remarrying of Gertrude a sign of infidelity to the filial connection to his father and to Hamlet?
        • Is she involved in Claudius plot of murder to the King?
      • How important is the general setting of Denmark to the overall play?
        • Is the use of Denmark use to draw more attention to the possible audience?
        • Was it used for political purposes?
        • Was it used to push more power to England as superiors?
      • Hamlet as national hero
        • Does he deserve such final pave in his death?
      • The Evil Plan of Claudius and Laertes
        • Compare and contrast the characters of Claudius and Laertes.
        • How alike or dislike are they and why?
        • Is the ignorance of the reason of the death of his father & sister the reason for revenge?
        • Was it because he long despise Hamlet way before the confession of love to Ophelia
      • Insanity of Hamlet
        • "His madness is poor Hamlet's enemy."
        • Explain Hamlet's motivation behind this comment
        • Examine how true his remark is.
      • A prince of a Prince
        • Is Fortinbras a valuable character in his own right?
        • Does he serve only to highlight aspects of Hamlet's personality?
        • Is his character be fit to be a remark on Hamlet
      • Goethe’s Opinion
        • What is Goethe's opinion of Hamlet?
        • Do you agree with his famous conclusions?
      • Death of Polonius
        • What could be Hamlet’s solution?
        • Does Hamlet truly weep for Polonius death?

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