Biol 260 Assignment Of Lease

Accounting for governmental and nonprofit organizations is explored. Topics covered include objectives and principles of accounting for governmental entities, differences between business and government accounting, modified and accrual accounting, transactions for the general fund, special revenue funds, capital projects funds, debt service funds, permanent funds, proprietary funds (enterprise and internal service), and fiduciary funds. The influence of FASB and GASB on reporting for colleges and universities, governmental entities, and other nonprofit organizations is reviewed.


ACTG230 Introduction to Statewide Accounting, Budgeting, and Human Resource System (SABHRS)

Credits: 3      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in ACTG101 or consent of instructor
This course gives students an overview of the accounting system utilized by state agencies. Course includes basic governmental accounting terminology and entry-level, practical application.


ACTG292 Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Consent of Helena College University of Montana faculty member in the selected program area and approval of Division Chair
This course is designed to meet specific learning needs of students. Typically, such independent study projects focus on learning opportunities not otherwise offered in our college curriculum. The student must seek prior approval of an instructor willing to serve as faculty sponsor. The student then initiates a proposal describing, among other things, the number of hours to be spent on the study project, specific learning outcomes, and how evaluation is to be accomplished. The approved proposal will have signatures of the student, faculty sponsor, Division Chair, and the Associate Dean.


ACTG298 Internship

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Consent of Helena College University of Montana faculty member in the selected program area and approval of Division Chair

This course is designed for the student who takes the initiative to perform professional skills outside of and in addition to the normal school curriculum. If done properly, it can be a highly rewarding experience and aid the student’s transition from school to work. The student initiates a proposal describing, among other things, the number of hours to be spent in the internship, specific learning outcomes, and how evaluation is to be accomplished. The approved proposal will have signatures of the Student, Faculty Supervisor, Division Chair, and the Associate Dean.


ACTG299 Capstone: Accounting Portfolio

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-“ or higher in each of ACTG201 or ACTG202; COMX111; WRIT101 or WRIT121T; and consent of instructor

This is a capstone class utilizing accounting research, financial analysis, business knowledge, computer techniques, and communication skills in presenting comprehensive financial information to stakeholders and preparing a self-reflection professional portfolio.


AHMS144 Medical Terminology

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

The course introduces students to complex medical terminology and facilitates students in recognizing that the meaning of complex medical terms can be determined by analyzing simpler components using prefixes, suffixes, and word roots. Correct pronunciation, definition, and spelling of these terms are derived through extensive usage of the textbook and computer software exercises. This course will connect the medical terminology to the basic structure and functioning of the systems of the human body including aspects of normal physiology and function, deviations from normal, diseases, and maintenance of health.


AHMS156 Medical Billing Fundamentals

Credits: 3 Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: None

AHMS 156 familiarizes students with the fundamentals of medical billing. Students will learn about commercial insurance carriers, Medicare, Medicaid, managed care, military insurance carriers, and worker’s compensation. Students will discuss insurance regulations and fee schedules, learn how to read an EOB and complete payment calculations. Students will also discuss HIPAA and its impact on healthcare.


AHMS164 Beginning Diagnosis Coding

Credits: 3 Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: None

This course covers the basic levels of theory and application of ICD-10-CM principles and guidelines for coding and sequencing diagnoses and procedures. Examples of patient records and coding exercises using the ICD-10 coding manual and simulation software will provide practice in coding and sequencing diagnoses. This course involves the application of ICD-10 diagnosis codes, knowledege of medical terminology and procedures, and the use of simulated patient case scenarios.


AHMS218 Complete Medical Coding

Credits: 3 Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AHMS144; NRSG100

Medical Coding is a fundamental skill requirement for the medical profession. Developing an excellent coding knowledge base will allow for future employment and advancement opportunities throughout the medical community. CPT, ICD9, & HCPCS codes will be used.


AHMS252 Computerized Medical Billing

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AHMS144; CAPP154, or consent of instructor

AHMS 252 familiarizes the student with the capabilities of medical practice software programs. Students learn and apply procedures such as patient scheduling, statement billing, payment reconciliation, insurance claim processing, procedure posting, HIPAA, medical records management, insurance company procedures, and insurance company regulations.


ANTY101 Anthropology and the Human Experience

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

A survey of the various subfields of anthropology, including archaeology, physical anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics.


ANTY103 Introduction to Latin American Studies

Credits: 3      Offered Occasionally in Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

A contemplation of Latin America from a variety of perspectives and disciplines – as anthropologists, geographers, historians, political scientists, and artists, to name a few – in order to better understand its histories, cultures, landscapes, and communities.


ANTY250 Introduction to Archaeology

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: none

Archaeology is the study of past human cultures through their material remains. Archaeology uses many different approaches and tools to study and explain how people lived in the distant and not-so-distant past. Artifacts, sites, settlements, and landscapes may be studied to help reveal how people lived, how they saw themselves and their world, what the environment was like, and how these factors interrelated and changed through time. In this class you will gain an overview of what archaeology is, how archaeology is done, and what it can tell us about our world - past, present and perhaps even a glimpse of our future. This course is intended to be an introductory survey of archaeology for undergraduate students, either as an elective or as a foundation for further studies in archaeology.

ARTH160 Global Visual Culture

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course is an introduction to a broad spectrum of the visual arts of Western and non-Western cultures from a Western art historical perspective with focus on seeing, thinking, and understanding art through critical analysis of form, content, function, and cultural context.


ARTZ105 Visual Language - Drawing

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course explores the principles of design, as well as application of those principles through a wide variety of hands-on projects.


ARTZ106 Visual Language - 2-D Foundations

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

This introductory drawing course covers basic principles of drawing and design in art. Major areas of study are space, form, volume, tone, texture, and line, using various drawing materials and techniques.


ARTZ221 Painting I

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ARTZ106 or consent of instructor

Practice and principles of painting in traditional media, including watercolor, acrylic, and oil painting. The course emphasis is on acquiring and refining technical skills, composition, and application of color theory. Research in historical and contemporary strategies.


ASTR110 Introduction to Astronomy

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: None

This course provides an introduction to astronomy with a lab component for the non-science major. Topics include the tools of astronomy, the solar system, stars and stellar evolution, the Milky Way, extragalactic astronomy, cosmology, and life in the universe.


AUTO104 Automotive Mechanics Core

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course covers proper shop safety procedures, safety materials, basic hand tool operation and identification, pneumatic and hydraulic tool operation and identification, vehicle hoist operation and safety, material safety data sheets (MSDS), precision measurement tools and application, fasteners, and different fastener grades.


AST108 Automotive Manual Drivetrains

Credits: 7
Co-requisites: AUTO104
Prerequisites: none

This course covers the theory of operation and service procedures related to dry friction clutches, manual transmissions/transaxles, front drive axles, rear drive axles, drivelines, transfer cases, and locking hubs. Students will disassemble, inspect, and re-assemble selected power train components.


AST118 Brakes and Chassis

Credits: 7
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST108, AST130, AST160

This course focuses on the function, diagnosis, and service practices of current automotive braking, steering and suspension systems. Students will learn about disc and drum brake hydraulic, mechanical, and electrical systems, to include ABS systems. Students will also study current steering, and suspension systems, to include 4 wheel alignments, suspension system, and tire service.


AST130 Introduction to Automotive Electronics

Credits: 7
Co-requisites: AUTO104
Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to give Automotive Technology students the basic electrical/electronic foundation needed to build on in other advanced courses requiring electrical and electronic knowledge. The course progresses from electrical/electronic theory, circuits and circuit failure, meters, and components through to starting and charging systems. The lab component of this course is designed to provide the hands-on activities common to automotive electrical/electronic applications. Emphasis will be placed on developing a knowledge and skill base needed to diagnose and repair general automotive electrical system malfunctions.


AST160 Automotive Engine Repair

Credits: 6
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104

This course covers the theory of operation, diagnosis, and service procedures associated with automotive engine repair. Students will learn automotive engine theory and will disassemble, assemble, and run electronically-controlled, overhead cam training engines and their related components.


AST172 Automotive Heating/Air Conditioning

Credits: 5
Co-requisites: AST230
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST130

This course is designed to provide Automotive Technology students with the knowledge and skills required to understand, service, and repair mobile air conditioning systems as used in the automotive industry. The course content includes heat and refrigeration principles, component function and interrelation concerns, and EPA requirements. The lab component is designed to provide the hands-on activities common to automotive, mobile air conditioning applications.


AST230 Electrical/Electronic Systems II

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST130

This course covers theory of operation, diagnosis, and service procedures related to selected electrical and electronically controlled systems. Systems/subjects covered include: vehicle communication networks, supplemental inflatable restraint systems, anti-theft systems, cruise control, remote keyless entry, and power accessories.


AST262 Engine Performance I

Credits: 8
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST130, AST230

This course covers theory of operation, diagnosis, and service procedures as they relate to engine performance. Subjects studied will include the effects of engine design on performance, federal emissions legislation, fuel composition and characteristics, ignition systems, electronic fuel injection, and emission control systems. Students will learn to use industry-accepted test procedures and test equipment to determine the cause of degraded engine performance, drivability complaints, and/or excessive exhaust emissions.


AST264 Engine Performance II

Credits: 5
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST130, AST160, AST230, AST262

This course covers principles of operation, safety practices, service, and diagnostic procedures related to computerized engine management systems. Alternative fuel and hybrid electric vehicles will be explored with special emphasis given to the development of proper diagnostic skills and the use of state of the art electronic test equipment.


AST270 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxles

Credits: 7
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST130, AST230, AST262

This course covers the theory of operation, diagnosis, and service procedures related to hydraulically controlled and computerized automatic transmissions and transaxles. Students will disassemble, rebuild, and reassemble selected transmissions/transaxles.


AST280 Applied Lab Experience and Light Repair

Credits: 5
Co-requisites: AST264 , AST270
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in AUTO104, AST108, AST118, AST160, AST172, AST230, AST262

This is a “capstone” experience course for Automotive Technology students in their second year, intended to apply their knowledge base acquired in previous courses to additional, repetitive lab experiences, thereby developing their critical thinking and physical service skills. It is important to note that this is not a “hobby shop” or “rebuild” course and will focus on “quick turn-around” light repair and problem solving. Emphasis will be placed on vehicle service practices, preventative maintenance, component diagnosis and replacement, electrical/electronic systems diagnosis and repair, heating and A/C service, and “under car” service and repair.


AVMT100 Introduction to Aviation Maintenance/ Mathematics/Basic Physics

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces students to many facets of aviation maintenance and its future. The course will also cover mathematical concepts such as powers and roots, ratio and proportion, and practical applications of plane geometry and algebra and basic physics, to include mechanical advantage, conversion between forms of energy, vibrations, the gas laws, heat, and pressure.


AVMT105 Basic Electricity

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course covers the elements of basic electricity and lays the foundation for understanding electrical circuitry concepts, the principles of electrical power generation and distribution, and aircraft electrical systems functions. This course will also describe current flow and analyze circuit operation in both theory and practical applications.


AVMT110 Aircraft Drawings/Weight and Balance

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces aircraft drawings, which enhance the ability to communicate ideas, to understand and explain an operation, and to record what has been done to an aircraft using symbols and different types of drawings such as views and projections used in aircraft maintenance. The course will also introduce weight and balance for safety and efficiency of flight, for maintaining the weight of an aircraft and its center of gravity within its specified limits. The course will cover the theory of aircraft weight and balance, weight and balance information, and the procedures for weighing an aircraft, and how to find the aircraft center of gravity and perform adverse-load center of gravity checks.


AVMT115 Materials and Processes/Fluid Lines and Fittings/ Cleaning and Corrosion Control

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course provides students the opportunity to inspect aircraft components for wear, identify aircraft hardware and materials, learn the basic theory of heat-treatment processes, nondestructive inspection procedures, and perform dye-penetrant and magnetic particle inspections. The course will also cover fluid lines and fittings, which must be of the correct size and material. The student is introduced to the selection of materials for both rigid and flexible fluid lines and to the proper installation of various types of aircraft fittings on these lines. The student is also taught the proper installation and inspection of high-pressure fluid lines in an aircraft. This course also covers the importance of recognizing and properly treating an aircraft structure that shows evidence of corrosion. This introduces the student to the selection of cleaning materials, with emphasis on their relationship to the type of material being cleaned. It stresses the identification of the various types of corrosion, the evaluation of corrosion damage, the proper way of removing the corrosion deposits, and treatment of the corroded areas.


AVMT120 Ground Operation and Servicing

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces servicing and ground operations of aircraft and covers the choice and identification of fuels for both reciprocating and turbine engine-powered aircraft and the necessary precautions to observe when fueling an aircraft. Since awareness of ground operations and hazards is emphasized in this section, the student is also introduced to “Safety in the Shop and on the Flight Line.” This increment also covers the proper procedure for starting reciprocating and turbine engines and the procedures for proper engine run-up, aircraft movement, and tie-down.


AVMT125 Maintenance Publications/Forms and Records/ Mechanic Privileges and Limitations

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the importance of understanding the regulations governing aviation maintenance and the information furnished by the aircraft, engine, and component manufacturers, and it emphasizes the importance of the legal aspects of aviation maintenance. The student will learn how to properly describe the work done to an aircraft and must be able to make the proper maintenance record entries, and explain these records and forms step-by-step to what is expected of the mechanic by the aircraft owner and what is allowed by the FAA.


AVMT130 Basic Aerodynamics

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces knowledge of basic aerodynamics, which deals with the motion of air and the forces acting on bodies moving relative to the air. In the study of aerodynamics, the student learns about why and how an airplane flies. Although aerodynamics is a complex subject, exploring the fundamental principles which govern flight is the main challenge in understanding what makes an airplane fly and begins with learning the four forces of flight, which are lift, weight, thrust, and drag.


AVMT135 Assembly and Rigging/Airframe Inspection

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces knowledge of the correct assembly and rigging of an aircraft, which is vital to safe and efficient flight. This section explains the relationship between aircraft rigging and the aerodynamics of flight. The course also introduces how to determine the legal airworthiness of an aircraft, its powerplant, and components. The student will learn the inspection aspects from a legal standpoint in which the emphasis is placed on the practical aspects and performance of required inspections.


AVMT140 Sheet Metal

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

This course introduces knowledge of sheet metal structures, which is one of the most important types of modern aircraft construction. This section gives students a solid lesson in the types and materials for metallic aircraft structures, a discussion that includes the stresses on aircraft structure and the strength of various metal materials. The student is taught to install conventional, special rivets, and fasteners; hand form, layout, and bend sheet metal; and to inspect and repair sheet metal structures.


AVMT145 Composites and Plastics

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces knowledge of nonmetallic composite structures, which is the second most important type of modern aircraft construction. This section gives students a solid lesson in the types of composite materials and their manufacture details, a discussion that includes the foundation for the understanding of “Nonmetallic Aircraft Structures” and “Composite Structure Inspection and Repair.”


AVMT150 Wood Structures

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces aircraft wood structures; the student will learn and be able to identify defects and the different kinds of woods suitable for their application, describe the kinds of glues and gluing techniques, and to restore old aircraft that have wood wing spars, ribs, and plywood structures.


AVMT155 Aircraft Covering/Aircraft Finishes

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the student to the application and maintenance of fabric covered aircraft. They will learn about how a fabric covering is properly attached to aircraft structures. The student will become familiar with the different types of covering materials that are used to cover an aircraft plus the dope fillers, paints, and rejuvenator finishes used on the fabric.


AVMT160 Aircraft Welding

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the knowledge of welding, which is important because modern structures are so complex and highly stressed that welding is usually a specialized type of repair done under highly controlled conditions. This section concludes the discussion of Metallic Aircraft Structures with a detailed description of the types, tools, materials, and methods of welding for aircraft construction, maintenance, and repair.


AVMT165 Hydraulic and Pneumatic Power Systems

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces hydraulic and pneumatic power systems, which are used to operate many of the vital systems, such as landing gear retraction, brakes, and powered flight controls. The students will inspect, check, service, troubleshoot, and repair these systems and will learn to work safely with these fluids and their pressurized containers.


AVMT170 Aircraft Landing Gear Systems/Position and Warning Systems

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces landing gear systems, which are subject to greater stresses than any other airframe system; therefore, the student must completely understand these vital components. This section includes lectures and schematic diagrams of these systems, exploded views of the assemblies, and illustrations of the workings of brake control systems, and the required maintenance. The different systems are covered in three areas: anti-skid brakes and their systems; electrical circuits and landing gear actuation; and warning systems for instruments that indicate and measure movement.


AVMT205 Aircraft Electrical Systems

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces electricity and airframe electrical systems. Basic electricity is taught along with typical airframe electrical circuits. The student will learn both general diagram symbols and specific electrical systems along with industry-accepted methods of installation and proper testing equipment used.


AVMT210 Aircraft Fuel Systems/Fire Protection Systems/Ice and Rain Control Systems

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the complex system of tanks, valves, and pumps of modern aircraft. The student will learn these systems in order to service them efficiently and safely. This section describes the various aircraft fuels and explains the fuel system requirements. This course also introduces fire protection systems and shows that fire is an ever possible danger in an aircraft, and that the student must be aware of the nature of fire and the appropriate methods and agents for detecting and extinguishing aircraft fires. This section explains how these protection systems work. This course also covers ice and rain control systems.


AVMT215 Cabin Atmosphere Control Systems

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This section covers maintaining an aircraft cabin environment with the proper pressure, temperature, humidity, and air movement, which is more than a matter of comfort; it is also a safety factor. This section backs up its discussion of these systems by starting with an explanation of “Human Needs in Flight” and how the atmosphere, the chemistry of oxygen, and the physics of heat, temperature, and pressure relate to this topic.


AVMT220 Aircraft Instrument Systems/Communication and Navigation Systems

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces instrument systems that are needed to provide the flight crew with data relating to the operating of the various flight and powerplant systems. This section describes the instruments and the basic operating principles of the systems that run them. The student will learn the installation and maintenance of these systems. Aircrafts depend upon electronic navigation and communication equipment. The student will learn their responsibility for determining the condition of the installed equipment and its interface with the aircraft itself. The student will also receive a detailed discussion of communication and navigation systems, as well as basic radio theory, to provide an understanding of how these systems should work.


AVMT225 Development of Aircraft Powerplants

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course will introduce the student to the development of aircraft powerplants from the Wright brothers’ first engine, to the modern piston, turbine, and turboprop engines that are used on aircraft and helicopters throughout the world today.


AVMT230 Reciprocating Engines and Systems

Credits: 6
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces aircraft powerplants that are of the reciprocating (piston) type. This section introduces the student to the different types of reciprocating engines, which include the detailed material that covers the step-by-step, hands-on procedures for reciprocating engine inspection, troubleshooting, repair, and overhaul. The course includes the operation of fuel metering components, induction and exhaust systems, heat dissipation, and starter systems.


AVMT235 Turbine Engines and Systems

Credits: 6
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces aircraft powerplants that are of the turbine type. This section introduces the student to the different types of turbine engines, which include the detailed material that covers the step-by-step, hands-on procedures for turbine engine inspection, troubleshooting, and repair. The course includes the operation of fuel metering components, induction and exhaust systems, method of heat dissipation, and starter systems.


AVMT240 Engine Instrument Systems

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

A knowledge of the conditions in an aircraft engine allows the flight crew to operate it in the most efficient and safest manner. For this reason, modern aircraft powerplants are equipped with sensors to monitor all of the vital parameters. This section covers all required powerplant instrumentation and also discusses the various types of electronic, digital, and computerized instrumentation of today’s aircraft.


AVMT245 Engine Electrical Systems/Auxiliary Power Unit

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

In this section the methods of generating and controlling electrical energy are discussed. It includes a refresher of electrical principles as they apply to powerplant operation and of each control system in detail. There is also a lecture on aircraft electrical system installation, to prepare the student for the practical application of electrical system service and maintenance. The student will also learn about the APU (auxiliary power unit) system that is used to provide electricity and compressed air when the aircraft is on the ground and the main engines are not operating.


AVMT250 Engine Fire Protection Systems

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces how modern aircraft powerplants are protected from fire with effective fire-detection and high-rate-discharge fire-extinguishing systems. These are described in detail so the student understands the practical application necessary in the servicing, inspection, troubleshooting, and repair of these systems.


AVMT255 Propellers and Unducted Fans

Credits: 6
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces all aspects of propeller theory, as a foundation for the understanding of propeller maintenance, repair, and inspection. A propeller is an airfoil, rotated by either a reciprocating or turbine engine. The propeller adds energy to the air passing through it by accelerating it rearward to produce a forward thrust. This course also introduces a new development in aircraft propulsion that is known as an ultra-high bypass (UHB) turbofan, or unducted fan (UDF) engine. A special lecture is devoted to the discussion of this engine.


BFIN205 Personal Finance

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in each of ACTG101; BGEN105 and M108T or M121

This course is designed to assist students in making effective personal financial decisions. Topics covered are concepts, strategies and techniques in analyzing financial situations and investment opportunities from the individual’s perspective.


BFIN265 Introduction to Business Finance

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in each of ACTG101; BGEN105 and M108T or M121

This course is designed to assist students in making effective financial business decisions. Topics include time value of money, cash flow, financial ratio analysis, long term financing/equity decisions, working capital management, personal finance, and the influence of the economic environment on a business’s financial considerations.


BGEN105 Introduction to Business

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: WRIT095 or placement in WRIT101 or WRIT121T

This course introduces the nature of business and the trends that change the way business is conducted. Topics covered in this course include the business environment, starting a business, management, ethics, social responsibility, human resources, marketing, and finance.


BGEN201 Foundations of Business Ethics

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105 and WRIT101 or WRIT121
This course is designed to apply business concepts in studying ethics. The course will help students differentiate between ethical and unethical practices in the business world. Topics covered include: basic principles of ethics, social costs, justice and fairness, utilitarianism, free market and rights, ethics in the marketplace, globalization, ethics in the role of government in business ethics, business and external exchanges, and ethics relating to internal constituencies (employee issues).


BGEN235 Business Law

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105

This course is an overview of business law, including the judicial system and procedures. Emphasis will be on ethics and law, tort law, contract law, sales and lease laws, negotiable instruments, bankruptcy laws, and legal ramifications for organizational types.


BGEN236 Business Law II

Credits: 3      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN235

This course is an overview of business law including the judicial system and procedures. Emphasis will be on ethics and law, contract law, warranties and product liability, consumer protection laws, personal property, real property, wills, intestacy, and trusts, business organizations and regulation, and the impact of computers and e-commerce on the law.


BGEN292 Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Consent of Helena College faculty member in the selected program area and approval of the Division Chair

This course is designed to meet specific learning needs of students. Typically, such independent study projects focus on learning opportunities not otherwise offered in our college curriculum. The student must seek prior approval of an instructor willing to serve as faculty sponsor. The student then initiates a proposal describing, among other things, the number of hours to be spent on the study project, specific learning outcomes, and how evaluation is to be accomplished. The approved proposal will have signatures of the Student, Faculty, Sponsor, Division Chair and the Associate Dean.


BGEN298 Internship

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Consent of Helena College faculty member in the selected program area and approval of the Division Chair

This course is designed for the student who takes the initiative to perform professional skills outside of and in addition to the normal school curriculum. If done properly, it can be a highly rewarding experience and aid the student’s transition from school to work. The student initiates a proposal describing, among other things, the number of hours to be spent in the internship, specific learning outcomes, and how evaluation is to be accomplished. The approved proposal will have signatures of the Student, Faculty Supervisor, Division Chair, and the Associate Dean.


BGEN299 Capstone: Business

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in each of ACTG101; BFIN265; BMGT210 or BMKT225; and WRIT101 or WRIT121; and consent of instructor

This capstone course helps students synthesize the learning process with the production of a Business Plan for launching of a new small business venture. Students utilize communication skills, computer skills, accounting skills, and management problem-solving techniques toward the development of the culminating project.


BIOB101 Discover Biology

Credits: 3
Co-requisites: BIOB102
Prerequisites: none

This nonmajors Biology course introduces the student to the fundamentals of biological organization, the scientific method, cellular biology, molecular biology, genetics, ecology, and origins. Relationships between form and function, acquisition and the use of energy, and continuity among generations will be addressed.


BIOB102 Discover Biology Lab

Credits: 1
Co-requisites: BIOB101
Prerequisites: none

This nonmajors biology lab course accompanies the Discover Biology lecture.


BIOB160 Principles of Living Systems

Credits: 4      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: none

The first course in a biology sequence is an introduction to the basic concepts and principles of general biology with an emphasis on lab experiences, critical thinking, problem solving, and the scientific method. Areas of study include organic chemistry and biochemistry, cellular biology, cell growth, genetics and genetic engineering, reproduction, cell metabolism, ecology, evolution theory, and classification systems in biology.


BIOB170 Principles of Biological Diversity

Credits: 4      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BIOB160

The second course in the biology sequence emphasizes study of the principles of biology within specific classifications such as kingdoms and species. Areas of study include viruses, bacteria, protists, fungi, plant, invertebrates, vertebrates, and human biology.


BIOB260 Cellular and Molecular Biology with Lab

Credits: 4      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY 143/144 and BIOB 101 or higher

An introduction to the biology of the cell, including the nature of organization of the cell, growth, basic bioenergetic and enzyme function, cell environment, membrane structure and function, the chemical and physical mechanisms of metabolism in plants and animals, and the work performed by cells. Laboratory is included.


BIOH104 Basic Human Biology

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: none

This one-semester course covers the basic anatomy and physiology of the human body. Lecture will concentrate on the physiology (function) of several body systems including the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, and urinary systems and how they contribute to homeostasis of the body. Lab will mainly concentrate on the anatomy (form) of bones, muscles, brain and spinal cord, and the heart.


BIOH201 Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: none

This is the first course of a two-semester course series. In this course the student will build on the general principles of cell biology and basic chemistry. Structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems will be studied, with emphasis on homeostasis, control and integration of the human body. Lecture will concentrate on physiology (function) while the lab experience will concentrate on anatomy (form), including histology (cellular level).


BIOH211 Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BIOH201

This is the second course of a two-semester course series. In this course the student will build on the general principles of cell biology and basic chemistry, structure and function of the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, digestive system, renal system and reproductive system. Lecture will concentrate on physiology (function) while the lab experience will concentrate on anatomy (form), including histology (cellular level).


BIOM250 Microbiology for Health Science

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: BIOM251
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BIOB160 or BIOH201

This course will survey both general and medical microbiology. It will emphasize medical microbiology and place it in perspective with the whole of human health. Bacterial, fungal, and viral agents of disease will be studied and the methods for their identification and control.


BIOM251 Microbiology for Health Science Lab

Credits: 1      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: BIOM250
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BIOB160 or BIOH201

This lab component is designed to reinforce the material covered in BIOM250 by providing students with a practical hands-on opportunity to execute and to observe supplemental exercises in a lab setting. This course can also function as a stand-alone course for students who have completed the lecture component of microbiology previously.


BMGT205 Professional Communication Fundamentals

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Placement in WRIT101 or WRIT121T

The course recognizes and creates effective approaches and styles for written, oral, and nonverbal communications appropriate to organizational situation, nature of message, and audience. The course addresses professional document and presentation designs, choices of media, and tones for individual and organizational communications.


BMGT210 Small Business Entrepreneurship

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105

This course introduces the student to the entrepreneurial mindset necessary to discover opportunities for markets and situations in which a small business can be developed successfully. Topics covered include the nature of small business, seeking entrepreneurial opportunities, developing new ventures, marketing and managing a small business, and the social and legal environment of businesses.


BMGT215 Human Resource Management

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105

This course introduces the student to an overview of the background of human resource management, acquisition of human resources, training and development of employees, compensation of human resources, and labor relations. Topics covered include human resource planning, recruitment, selection and training, equal opportunity and employment laws, job analysis and design, performance management systems, compensation and benefits, and employee/labor relations.


BMGT235 Management

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105 and WRIT101 or WRIT121

Students learn efficient and effective use of resources in achieving organizational goals. Topics include the environment of management, the functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling, and decision-making for organizational leaders.


BMGT263 Legal Issues in Human Resources

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105

This course introduces the student to an overview of legal issues in human resources and employment law. Topics covered include employment relationships, hiring, termination, employment discrimination, employment regulation (wage and hour, safety, workers’ compensation), and employee evaluation.


BMIS270 Management Information Systems Foundations for Business

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI172

The field of Management Information Systems (MIS) is an exciting academic discipline that is integral to all business activities. This course is designed to introduce students to MIS and examine how these powerful systems have fundamentally reshaped modern organizations, as well as our society. This course focuses on the key components of MIS - people, software, hardware, data, and telecommunications, highlighting how these components can be integrated and managed to create and sustain competitive advantages.


BMIS285 Fundamentals of Management Information Systems

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: none

The Fundamentals of Management Information Systems course is designed to introduce technology students to information systems. This course focuses on the key components of information systems – people, software, hardware, data, and telecommunications. Technology students will learn the terminology used in the information technology (IT) field as well as how information flows within a business. They will also gain an understanding of how local, regional, national, and global businesses utilize IT to gain competitive advantage.


BMKT225 Marketing

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in each of BGEN105 and WRIT101 or WRIT121

This course introduces the student to making marketing decisions. Topics covered include the marketplace and consumers, marketing plans, market analysis, the marketing mix, and global marketing.


BMKT240 Advertising

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in BGEN105

This course is designed to acquaint students with the fundamentals and terminology of advertising. Topics covered are the role of advertising, demographic segmentation, advertising psychology, advertising strategies, media strengths and weaknesses, layout and design, and careers in advertising. Class participants will develop their own advertisements using a variety of media.


CAPP100 Short Courses: Computer Literacy

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the students to computer hardware and software and their uses. The course provides basic computer literacy concerning terminology, careers, and social issues related to computer, network, and information technology issues including ethics, crime, and copyright issues.


CAPP106 Short Courses: Computer Applications

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: none

This course is an overview of the uses of the microcomputer in the technical and health fields. Topics will include the microcomputer operating system and overviews of word processing and spreadsheet applications.


CAPP131 Basic MS Office

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course provides students with basic computer literacy, terminology, career information, and social issues related to computers, as well as network and information technology. Topics include issues with computer use, ethics, crime, and copyright laws. Students will explore a computer operating system, word processing and spreadsheet application software, and the internet to find solutions for real world problems. Through hands-on activities participants will learn effective uses of a Windows-based computer as a tool to increase productivity..


CAPP153 MS Powerpoint

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: None
Using MS PowerPoint, students will apply effective design concepts and features to create readable, well-balanced presentations to use in a business or educational setting. A variety of appropriate presentation techniques will be discussed and applied.


CAPP154 MS Word

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: None

Students will learn basic principles of word processing. Emphasis is placed on creating, saving, editing, and formatting documents along with some of the special features of word processing software. This course uses Microsoft Word.


CAPP155 MS Publisher

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisite: None

Students will learn the basic principles of design as it applies to the publication of business cards, newsletters, invoices, business flyers, and other business publications. Emphasis is placed on creating, saving, editing, and designing publications using text and graphic elements. MS Publisher will be used in this course.


CAPP156 MS Excel

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: none

spreadsheets for personal and business tasks. Students will learn basic principles such as formatting a workbook, working with formulas and functions, and creating charts and tables. Students will also learn important spreadsheet concepts such as order of precedence in formulas, function syntax, absolute and relative cell references, what-if analysis, and data validation.


CAPP158 Basic MS Access

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course highlights the role of data management and relational databases in the business environment. Students learn how to create, edit, and manage large amounts of data with Microsoft Access. Students will learn basic database design, how to create tables and forms, sorting techniques, and how to run queries.


CAPP208 E-Learning Application and Web 2.0+ Basics

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

This course explores connections between technology and the teaching and learning processes through current research in instructional technology. Students will examine industry standard e-learning development tools for training in a virtual environment including various asynchronous, synchronous, rapid development, and web-based technologies. Students will compare and contrast popular e-learning authoring tools. The tools demonstrated in this course will include lecture capture, web authoring, wikis, virtual reality software, video editing, Google Docs, and others. Students will gain a better understanding of which media are best suited to meet their learning objectives and/or business training goals.


CAPP266 Advanced MS Excel

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CAPP156 or CSCI172

This is an advanced course that builds upon the skills learned in CAPP156 MS Excel or CSCI 172 Intro to Computer Modeling. Excel spreadsheets can be used for a variety of accounting applications, including general ledger, payroll, taxation, budgeting, and forecasting. Spreadsheets are also valuable tools for personal finance.


CHMY121 Introduction to General Chemistry

Credits: 3
Co-requisites: CHMY122
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M095 or satisfactory score on placement test

This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the basic principles of chemistry and the physical world at a microscopic scale. Topics include the atomic model of matter, energy, chemical bonds and reactions, the states of matter, acids and bases, and an introduction to organic chemistry. The course integrates lecture and homework assignments to provide students practical examples of applications of course material to “real world” situations.


CHMY122 Introduction to General Chemistry Lab

Credits: 1
Co-requisites: CHMY121
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M095 or satisfactory score on placement test

This lab component is designed to reinforce the material covered in CHMY121 by providing students with a practical hands-on opportunity to execute and to observe supplemental exercises in a lab setting.


CHMY123 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY124
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY121 and CHMY122 or consent of instructor

This course is designed to expand on the information presented in Introduction to General Chemistry, providing students with a working knowledge of the basics of organic and biologic chemistry. Topics include the basic organic functional groups and their reaction properties, and basic biologic molecules such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and enzymes and how these molecules form and function in biologic systems. The course integrates lecture, homework assignments, and lab exercises to provide students practical examples of applications of course material to “real world” situations.


CHMY124 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry Lab

Credits: 1      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY123
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY121/CHMY122 or consent of instructor

This lab component is designed to reinforce the material covered in CHMY123 by providing students with a practical hands-on opportunity to execute and observe supplemental exercises in a lab setting.


CHMY141 College Chemistry I

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY142
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in M121

This is the first semester of a two-semester college chemistry sequence. Topics covered include atomic structure, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, the periodic table, and the states of matter. The experimental and mathematical aspects of chemistry are emphasized.


CHMY142 College Chemistry I Lab

Credits: 1      Offered Fall Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY141
Prerequisites:
A “C-” or higher in M121
This is the lab portion of CHMY141. It is designed to reinforce the material covered in CHMY141.


CHMY143 College Chemistry II

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requistes: CHMY144
Prerequisites: A “C-”or higher in CHMY141 and M121

This is the second semester of a two-semester college chemistry sequence designed for students entering a science, engineering, or pre-med field of study. Covered topics include solution chemistry; chemical equilibria, kinetics, and thermodynamic; acids and bases; electrochemistry; and nuclear chemistry. Heavy emphasis will be placed the mathematical aspects of chemistry and on making connections to “real-world” applications of chemistry.


CHMY144 College Chemistry II Lab

Credits: 1      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requistes: CHMY143
Prerequisites: A “C-”or higher in CHMY141 and M121

This is the lab portion of College Chemistry II. It is designed to reinforce the material learned in CHMY143.


CHMY221 Organic Chemistry I

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY222
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY143/144

This is the first semester of a one-year sequence with emphasis on fundamental concepts of structure, nomenclature, properties and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds, and an introduction to biochemical molecules. Laboratory offered as CHMY222.


CHMY222 Organic Chemistry I Lab

Credits: 2      Offered Fall Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY221
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY143/144

This lab component is designed to reinforce the material covered in CHMY221 by providing students with a practical hands-on opportunity to execute and to observe supplemental exercises in a lab setting.


CHMY223 Organic Chemistry II

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY224
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY221/222

This is the second semester of a one-year sequence with emphasis on functional group interconversions, chemistry of aromatic compounds, multistep reaction pathways, molecular structure determinations using spectroscopic methods, retrosynthetic analysis, and introduction to biological chemistry. Laboratory included.


CHMY224 Organic Chemistry II Lab

Credits: 2      Offered Spring Semester
Co-requisites: CHMY223
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CHMY221/222

This integral lab component is designed to reinforce the material covered in CHMY223 by providing students with a practical hands-on opportunity to execute and to observe supplemental exercises in a lab setting.


CJUS121 Introduction to Criminal Justice

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT095 or equivalent score on writing placement

This course is a survey of the history and philosophy of American justice concepts with the emphasis on present day practical application through the efforts of the law enforcement, court, and correction segments of the criminal justice system.


COMM132 Interpersonal Communications

Credits: 1      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in COMX111 or consent of instructor

Interpersonal communication, or how humans communicate with one another in our personal lives, impacts the function and form of communication in other areas. Through a theoretical study of interpersonal communication students will gain an understanding of the maintenance and termination of platonic, romantic, and family relationships. In addition, we will explore topics of attraction, initiation, commitment, intimacy, child-parent communication, and destructive behavior.


COMM133 Small Group Communication

Credits: 1      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in COMX111 or consent of instructor

This course studies group communication processes. Focusing on communication theory, the course will dissect how groups communicate effectively and ineffectively and the impact on day-to-day human relations.


COMX111 Introduction to Public Speaking

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Development of oral communication skills through an emphasis on audience analysis, organization of ideas, and delivery of spoken messages.


COMX250 Introduction to Public Relations

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in WRIT101 or WRIT121T, or consent of instructor

This course introduces students to theory and to practice of public relations, with practical application of public relations, writing, and delivery strategies. Additionally, students will study the media and produce a communications plan.


CRWR212 Introduction to Nonfiction Workshop

Credits: 3      Offered Occasionally
Prerequisites: None

Students will gain confidence and competence in writing through journal writing and then taking those journal entries and creating essays. The journal exercises will be guided exercises, designed to elicit a variety of responses and ideas from the students.


CRWR240 Introduction to Creative Writing Workshop

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semestery
Prerequisites: None

This course is designed to give students experience with generating and developing original works of poetry and short fiction through two methods: analysis and discussion of works by practicing authors, and drafting and polishing their own work through workshops and writing tanks.


CSCI100 Introduction to Programming

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

This course is an introduction to elementary programming techniques using Pseudo code, flowcharting, and C#. A wide range of programs will be written by the student and run on a computer. Students learn the techniques of looping, functions and sub/routines, arrays, variables and data types, user input/output, file input/output, and appropriate programming practices.


CSCI111 Programming with Java I

Credits: 4      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI100

This course offers a thorough introduction to the concepts behind object-oriented software development, including the terminology and methodologies utilizing the Java Programming Language. This course provides the student with the fundamentals of programming with a focus on object-oriented techniques. These skills are needed to work effectively in the area of information technology. The ability to understand the relationship between data and the algorithmic manipulation of data is crucial in IT related fields.


CSCI115 Programming with PERL

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisite: CSCI100 or consent of instructor

This course will familiarize the student in the use of the PERL scripting language for automating administrative and business operations. Topics include file system management, user administration, directory services, database administration, log files, security, and network monitoring. Students will implement PERL scripts on Windows and Linux platforms.


CSCI121 Programming with Java II

Credits: 4      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI111

This course covers some of the more advanced topics of Java Standard Edition. Topics covered include Java integration to databases (JDBC), Generics, Collections, Object Serialization, Network Sockets, Advanced GUI development with Swing components, and multi-threaded applications. This course does NOT cover Servlets, JavaServer Pages, or Enterprise JavaBeans as they are covered in CT262.


CSCI172 Introduction to Computer Modeling

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: None

This course covers problem solving with spreadsheets and databases using the computer to analyze a set of data; presentation of results of analysis.


CSCI206 .NET Applications

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSCI111 and CSCI240

This course covers advanced desktop and web application features of the .NET framework. Students will learn Exception Handling, Collections, Multithreading, .NET XML Web Services, ADO.NET, ADO.NET Entity Framework, Stored Procedures, and Object Oriented Programming. Students will use C# language and Microsoft SQL Server for all projects.


CSCI210 Web Programming

Credits: 3      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSCI100, CSCI240, and MART145

This course provides students with skills necessary to use the PHP scripting language to develop dynamic Web-based applications. Topics of study include the fundamentals of the scripting, using PHP with HTML forms, creating functions, and integrating with MySQL databases.


CSCI211 Client Side Web Development

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSCI100 and MART145

This course focuses on the concepts of client side web development including AJAX Development covering JavaScript, DOM, XML, and Asynchronous page updates.


CSCI212 Web Server Administration

Credits: 3      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in ITS224, ITS280 and ITS164 or NTS104

In this course, students explore issues dealing with building and managing a web server. Topics will include web server and network issues, Domain Name System, TCP/IP connectivity, server setup, web site administration, Internet commerce, and security. Students will implement web servers using Apache and IIS.


CSCI221 Systems Analysis and Design

Credits: 4      Offered Fall Semester
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI240

This course studies the concepts and skills needed to analyze and design information systems. The primary focus in this course is to prepare the student to understand the systems development life cycle. Special emphasis is placed on business functions, process flows, dataflow diagramming, entity relationship diagramming, and database requirements.


CSCI236 XML Data Processing

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI240

The course studies the use of XML data in data processing and its use in data transmission between organizations. Students will learn to create and validate XML data documents. Students will create applications that generate, transform, query, and transmit XML data. Students will create applications that manipulate XML data using professional software development tools on multiple platforms.


CSCI238 Standards Based Mobile Applications

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI111 and MART145

This is an introductory course in developing mobile applications utilizing industry standard languages, tools, and frameworks. Applications will be created using standards based HTML 5, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) 3, and JavaScript along with frameworks to assist in the deployment to different mobile platforms. Frameworks such as PhoneGap will be utilized to gain access to platform devices and sensors.


CSCI240 Databases and SQL

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: none

This course focuses on the concepts of relational databases and includes tables, records and typed fields, primary and foreign keys, and database normalization, and a thorough coverage of Structured Query Language “SQL”. Through a variety of exercises, the student will learn how to model a business enterprise using the entity-relationship approach to relational database design. The Oracle database is used for all exercises.


CSCI242 Enterprise Applications

Credits: 4     Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSCI111, and CSCI240

The topics covered are applicable to enterprise database platforms such as Oracle’s 10g or IBM’s DB2. Students will get in-depth, hands-on experience creating numerous increasingly complex Java applications using enterprise tools and frameworks. The Hibernate Object Relational Mapping framework will be used for database interaction. Java XML Web Services will be covered in the REST and SOAP styles.


CSCI276 Application Security

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in CSCI111 and CSCI240

The course studies the best practices in the development of secure software applications. Through code reviews, students will analyze and test application code for security vulnerabilities such as SQL injection, XML injection, cross site scripting, buffer overflow, and improper error handling. Students will analyze different types of security attacks and discuss countermeasures to safeguard applications and data. Security issues of particular programming languages, platforms, and application types will also be discussed. Network and physical security are not covered in this course but are covered in ITS218 Network Security.


CSCI292 Independent Study

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Instructor approval

This course is designed to meet specific learning needs of students. Typically, such independent study projects focus on learning opportunities not otherwise offered in our college curriculum. The student must seek prior approval of an instructor willing to serve as faculty sponsor. The student then initiates a proposal describing, among other things, the number of hours to be spent on the study project, specific learning outcomes, and how evaluation is to be accomplished. The approved proposal will have signatures of the student, faculty sponsor, division chair, and the Associate Dean.


CSCI298 Internship

Credits: 1-3
Prerequisites: Instructor approval

Designed for the student who takes the initiative to perform work outside of and in addition to the normal school curriculum. If done properly, it can be a highly rewarding experience and aid the student’s transition from school to work.


CSCI299 Thesis/Capstone

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: Instructor approval

This course is a self-directed, integrated, and applied learning opportunity that integrates the coursework, knowledge, and skills gained in Computer Technology coursework. Students will be matched with an organization that needs assistance on an Information Technology project. Students will work with the organization and assigned Computer Technology Faculty to complete the project. Project demonstration and required documentation will be presented at project completion.


CSTN100 Fundamentals of Construction Technology

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Students in attendance will learn the importance that safety has in the construction industry. Students will learn to identify and follow safe work practices as well as inspection of power equipment (portable and stationary) and hand tools. Students will also demonstrate the safe and proper use of each tool.


CSTN120 Carpentry Basics and Rough-In Framing

Credits: 5
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course will introduce the student to the different components used for residential floor systems (joists, rim joist hangers, etc.) wall systems (king studs, timmer studs, headers, wall plates, rough sills, etc.) roof systems (both truss and rafter) and basic stair building, with an emphasis placed on platform framing.


CSTN124 Cabinet Installation, Interior/Finish/Paint

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course will include installing interior doors and hardware, interior casing, and base trim installation. Painting, staining, and application of clear finishes will be used to complete surfaces and cabinet installation.


CSTN137 Insulation and Energy Building Practices

Credits: 1
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course will introduce students to energy efficient building and insulating techniques and practices.


CSTN145 Exterior Finish, Metal Soffit and Fascia

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

Students will learn about the installation of windows, exterior doors, locksets, and hardware. Also covered is the installation of exterior corners, soffit, fascia, cornices, and exterior sidings.


CSTN148 Blueprint Reading, Codes and Estimating

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Covers a graphic approach to problems involving residential drawings in orthographic and perspective design. Students will study blueprint symbols and working drawings and develop a residential house plan, and develop a list of materials, timeline, and cost breakdown from this working blueprint.


CSTN150 Drywall Application and Finishing

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

Students will learn about the different thickness and types of drywall and where each thickness and types are used and then the student will learn proper taping, the different finishing, and texture techniques.


CSTN160 Construction Concepts and Building Lab

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course introduces and allows the students to practice the building procedures learned, along with the safety skills to be used in building.


CSTN161 Construction Concepts and Building Lab II

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

Students will demonstrate installation of insulation, vapor barriers, windows, doors (both interior and exterior), siding soffits, fascia, cornices, gypsum board, cabinets, and application of interior finish, painting, staining, and clear coat finish of interior trim.


CSTN171 Site Prep, Foundations, and Concrete Installation

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100, CSTN160, CSTN161, and CSTN230

This course covers basic site layout, distance measurement, and leveling. Students will be introduced to concrete formulas, foundation and flatwork, as well as handling and placing concrete. The use of manufactured forms will also be covered in this course.


CSTN175 Roofing Applications

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course introduces the student to the materials used and the installation techniques of the various roofs. The student will learn about the different types of asphalt, fiberglass, cedar shakes, shingles, and the different styles of metal roofing, delta rib, standing seam, and metal shakes. Students will learn the different methods of sealing up the valleys. The students will be installing fiberglass shingles on a roof with a cricket for practice. The students will make a water tight valley using the newer weaving pattern design.


CSTN200 Light Equipment and Rigging

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: none

Students in attendance will be introduced to the basic methods and safety procedures of moving material and equipment on the job site. Students will also learn basic inspection techniques, knots, and load handling along with the American National Standards Institute hand signals. In addition, the students will operate a skid steer, three forklifts each with different capacities, rough terrain forklift (extend-a-boom forklift), and scissor lifts. The students will be given the chance to operate additional equipment if available.


CSTN211 Advanced Framing Systems

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100, CSTN160, and CSTN161

Students will expand knowledge of floor, wall, and roof systems by studying and applying techniques reflecting new technologies in both residential and light commercial construction.


CSTN225 Decks and Patios

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

Emphasis will be on designing and identifying the different types of decks and patios. It will introduce students to traditional and new deck materials, different concrete-stamping methods, and types of placers. Several basic fence styles will also be described.


CSTN230 Advanced Roof, Floor, Wall, and Stair Systems

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100, CSTN160 and CSTN161

Provides lab/site setting for application of building practices covered in third semester curriculum. Emphasis will be on advanced framing techniques for floor, wall, and roof systems. Building an onsite structure will also provide a setting for practical application of learning outcomes associated with CSTN200 and CSTN211.


CSTN235 Stationary Machines and Joinery

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course introduces students to the use of stationary machines commonly used in a shop/lab setting. Emphasis will be on safety and general usages and applicable material processing and practices. The student should be able to name, recognize, and build the different components used in building a cabinet.


CSTN236 Advanced Stationary Machine and Joinery

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course covers the usage of a multi-pin borer, pocket cutters, European hinge cutter, and drill presses along with advanced dado blade techniques on the table saw. The student will be doing advanced material processing for the different components used in building a cabinet.


CSTN250 Construction Estimating

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100, CSTN160 and CSTN161

This class introduces the students to the basic concept of construction estimating for both residential and light commercial construction with emphasis on residential. Students will learn how to use a construction calculator to estimate site-development, concrete costs, and all building materials associated with a construction project.


CSTN260 Construction Concepts and Building Lab III

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN230

Advanced Structural Concepts and Building Lab IV provides the lab/field setting for the application of the building practices taught during the 4th semester classes. Primary emphasis will be on implementing the practices taught in CSTN171 and CSTN225. Other time may be spent onsite implementing live work components of some 3rd semester classes. The lab/shop settings as well as off-campus and on-campus projects may be used for guided practice, live work, and/or individual student assessment. Upon successful completion of CSTN260, students should be able to perform the student outcomes applicable to class safety, in a suitable time frame allowable in the construction industry.


CSTN270 Foundations of Construction Project Management

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CSTN100

This course introduces topics such as licensing, code jurisdictions, building inspection, record keeping, timelines, project development, ordering materials, supervision of construction, OSHA, employee rights, safety requirements, subcontractors, construction loans, punch lists, etc.


CSTN295 Practicum: Construction

Credits: 2
Prerequisites: Successful completion of first-year construction program courses

This class provides classroom and lab settings for the application of building practices not covered in the current 1st year’s curriculum. These modules were chosen because of current construction trends, advisor recommendations, and student requests. Topics covered in this year’s special topics class may include but are not limited to electrical, plumbing, metal stud construction, with a variety of different community based projects.


CSTN298 Construction Internship

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Successful completion of first-year construction program courses

This course enhances classroom learning with a real-life work experience. The host contractor provides on-the-job training. The student intern will gain valuable work experience and interact with professional construction workers and management personnel.


CT161 Web Page Graphic Design

Credits: 4      Offered Spring Semester
Prerequisite: A “C-” or higher in MART145

This course studies professional page layout and graphic design techniques for the Web. Students will learn to critique existing Web sites with an eye toward aesthetics and usability. Students will build effective site layouts based on visual design principles that enhance the site aesthetics. Through professional graphics tools, students will create Web graphics and animation. The impact of different design techniques on site accessibility will be discussed. Students will also learn to effectively use cascading style sheets (CCS) to stylize entire web sites.


CT230 Introduction to the Large Enterprise System I

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Prerequisites: A “C-” or higher in CAPP100 or placement; A “C-” or higher in CSCI100 or previous programming experience; A “C-” or higher in ITS280 or previous desktop computer administration experience; or consent of instructor

Техники обнимали друг друга, подбрасывая вверх длинные полосы распечаток. Бринкерхофф обнимал Мидж. Соши заливалась слезами. - Джабба, - спросил Фонтейн, - много они похитили.

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